Pulitzer winning climate news

Katherine Bagley

Katherine Bagley is a reporter for InsideClimate News who covers the intersection of environmental science, politics and policy, with an emphasis on climate change. She is co-author of the InsideClimate News book "Bloomberg's Hidden Legacy: Climate Change and the Future of New York City," published in November 2013 and winner of the Deadline Club's Award for Reporting by Independent Digital Media. Her writing has also been included in the anthology Best American Science and Nature Writing. 

She previously worked as a freelance journalist and editor, contributing print and multimedia work to Popular Science, Audubon, OnEarth and The Scientist, among other publications.

You can reach her by email at katherine.bagley@insideclimatenews.org.

 

Articles

After Katrina, New Orleans' Climate Conundrum: Fight or Flight?

A decade later, many still wrestle with staying home vs. leaving—a decision millions more will face along the coasts as seas rise, storms intensify.

Aug 27, 2015

One month after Hurricane Katrina tore through the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in 2005, Colette Pichon Battle stood in front of her childhood home near Slidell, surveying the storm's damage.

Helping Cities Navigate a Climate-Changed Future

A Q&A with Anu Ramaswami, an urban sustainability expert at the University of Minnesota, about a new program to make cities sustainable.

Aug 21, 2015

As cities across the globe wrestle with population growth and how to adapt their infrastructure to the realities of climate change, a new coalition of scientists is aiming to help.

Research Says 27 Percent of California’s Drought Attributable to Climate Change

New study gives California crisis managers something else to worry about: evapotranspiration.

Aug 20, 2015

As California’s four-year drought has drinking and groundwater reserves at dangerously low levels, households rationing water and the agricultural sector struggling to keep its crops alive, the question has been: how much of a culprit is climate change? New research published Thursday now says as much as 27 percent of the drought can be attributed to global warming.

Arctic Drilling Approval Threatens Obama's Climate Legacy

By giving the final OK for Shell to drill in the Chukchi Sea, President Obama undermines his recent push to protect the climate and environment.

Aug 18, 2015

The Obama administration's final approval of Royal Dutch Shell's drilling for oil in Alaska's Chukchi Sea provoked an angry reaction on Monday from environmentalists who had come to consider President Obama a champion in the fight against climate change.

Minorities Targeted with Misinformation on Obama's Clean Power Plan, Groups Say

The National Black Chamber of Commerce launched a PR campaign against the carbon regulations, fueled by its oil and gas industry sponsors, critics contend.

Aug 12, 2015

This story was updated with new details Aug. 13

After the Environmental Protection Agency released its groundbreaking carbon regulations last week, opponents worked to fill the airways and newspaper opinion pages with the message that the Clean Power Plan would cost minority communities millions of jobs and increase their poverty levels by more than 25 percent.

Several Butterfly Species Could Go Extinct by 2050

Worsening droughts that come with climate change threaten butterflies' survival in Great Britain, new research shows.

Aug 10, 2015

A team of British scientists warned on Monday that if greenhouse gas emissions continue unchecked and droughts become more frequent and extreme, several butterfly species could become extinct as early as 2050.

Where the Presidential Candidates Fall on Climate Change

There are subtle differences on a key issue even among candidates of the same party.

Aug 7, 2015

American voters are in a tough spot: With five Democrats and 17 Republicans vying for the Oval Office in 2016, the U.S. has one of its largest pools of presidential candidates in nearly a century—making the task of navigating their stances on the issues more onerous than usual.

On the issue of climate change,  while most Democrats are strong proponents of climate action and most Republican contenders fall on the side of denial or hedging about the human role in climate change, there are subtle differences even among candidates of the same party.

Climate Remains a Non-Issue in GOP Primary Season

Even in a week when the Obama administration unveiled its major climate initiative, Republican presidential candidates ignored the topic altogether.

Aug 7, 2015

The top 10 Republican candidates for president spent 120 minutes of their first primary season debate Thursday night in Cleveland duking it out over issues like foreign policy, national security, immigration, abortion and the economy.

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