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Robert Krier, Weather Insider

Robert Krier has been fascinated with weather since early childhood in Los Angeles, where the rare thunderstorm was always a thrill. He studied meteorology at San Diego State University and considered a career in the field. Instead, he settled on journalism. He's been working for newspapers for 30 years, the last 25 at U-T San Diego, formerly the San Diego Union-Tribune.

In 1999, Krier persuaded the editors at the paper to send him on a tornado-chasing travel story. He drove nearly 4,000 miles through the Midwest with a chasing tour company. He saw two tornados, hail the size of baseballs, and magnificent thunderstorms that put to shame the comparatively weak storms of his youth. He also saw firsthand nature's destructive potential. The tour visited the devastated town of Moore, an Oklahoma City suburb that had been hit days before. That twister had winds estimated in excess of 300 mph, still considered the fastest naturally occurring winds ever recorded.

The trip rekindled his weather fascination, and he's been writing about weather and climate issues ever since. On a trip to the Oregon coast, where storm lovers often hole up to revel in violent winter storms, he was nearly blown off a bluff by a 64-mph gust.

Krier has written about big-picture issues: climate change, El Niño and La Niña and other major forces that can affect weather and climate. But he's into the small-scale, everyday stuff, too. He has a weather station in his backyard so he can remotely monitor wind, temperature and precipitation, and he's got a back-up rain gauge and a couple extra thermometers, just in case.

 

Articles

Plants and Soils Could Accelerate Climate's Warming, Study Warns

Nov 28 , 2012
As the climate warms, plants and soils may not absorb more carbon as scientists once thought.

Can Hurricanes Be Tamed? Scientists Propose Novel Cloud-Seeding Method

Oct 24 , 2012
Hurricanes will increase with climate change. Researchers say they've come up with a way to weaken storms by cloud-seeding them before they form.

U.S. Paying a Price for Lack of Water Policy

Sep 17 , 2012
Climate change has made managing the nation's waterways more important than ever, but policies remain fragmented.

Severe Heat, Drought and Wildfires: State Climatologist on Colorado's 'New Normal'

Aug 22 , 2012
Nolan Doesken has been studying Colorado's weather for 35 years. He explains his job, and what's ahead for his state because of climate change.

Extreme Heat, Drought Show Vulnerability of Nuclear Power Plants

Aug 15 , 2012
Reactor shutdown in Connecticut is latest sign that nuclear energy would face challenges from climate change.

2012 Hurricane Forecast, Coming This Week, Is Even Trickier Than Usual

Aug 6 , 2012
A couple of productive storms could go a long way to lessen the impacts of the historic drought. But the outlook remains uncertain, officials say.

As Drought Punishes, Some Americans Reeling from Billion-Dollar Hail Damage

Jul 18 , 2012
Property damage from just two intense hailstorms that pelted large cities recently could exceed $1.5 billion.

IPCC Scientist on How Climate Change Is Worsening Wildfires

Jul 3 , 2012
Steven Running explains link between warming temperatures and the pine beetle explosion and the latest spate of U.S. wildfires.