Pope Francis's Eight Major Messages, in His Own Words

In his sweeping encyclical, the pope appeals to humanity to face the global climate change crisis.

Climate change "represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day," Pope Francis says in his June 18, 2015, encyclical on the environmental that urges all of humanity to Credit: Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk

In a document remarkable for its sweep and its depth, Pope Francis unveiled his long-awaited encyclical on the environment on Thursday, in essence calling on humanity to address a climate and environmental crisis that calls for urgent global action.

The nearly 200-page treatise entitled "Laudato Si" or "Be Praised," stretches far beyond a usual encyclical, documents meant to steer church teaching for the world's 1.1 billion Catholics. It instead addresses the entire global community in a harsh critique of modern life, calling for a reassessment of lifestyle and politics and economics that have led to the climate change that threatens us all.

"Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods. It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day," the pope said.

"I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all."

The encyclical stretched on to encompass the many areas of the crisis, their causes and potential solutions. He was unsparing in his critique of politicians, business and industry leaders and ordinary people alike, urging them to look within for the answers.

"Humanity is called to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle, production and consumption, in order to combat this warming or at least the human causes which produce or aggravate it," he said.

The pope's eight main critiques, in his own words:

We are the cause of the degradation.

"The climate is a common good, belonging to all and meant for all. At the global level, it is a complex system linked to many of the essential conditions for human life. A very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system."

"These situations have caused sister earth, along with all the abandoned of our world, to cry out, pleading that we take another course. Never have we so hurt and mistreated our common home as we have in the last two hundred years."

Credit: A coal-burning power station at night in Xiangfan, Hubei province in China. Credit: REUTERS



Fossil fuel burning is the climate change culprit.

"There is an urgent need to develop policies so that, in the next few years, the emission of carbon dioxide and other highly polluting gases can be drastically reduced, for example, substituting for fossil fuels and developing sources of renewable energy. Worldwide there is minimal access to clean and renewable energy."

"We know that technology based on the use of highly polluting fossil fuels – especially coal, but also oil and, to a lesser degree, gas – needs to be progressively replaced without delay."



The poor suffer most.

"Many of the poor live in areas particularly affected by phenomena related to warming, and their means of subsistence are largely dependent on natural reserves and ecosystemic services such as agriculture, fishing and forestry. They have no other financial activities or resources which can enable them to adapt to climate change or to face natural disasters, and their access to social services and protection is very limited."



Poverty and inequality must be addressed.

"The same mindset which stands in the way of making radical decisions to reverse the trend of global warming also stands in the way of achieving the goal of eliminating poverty. A more responsible overall approach is needed to deal with both problems: the reduction of pollution and the development of poorer countries and regions."

The aftermath of the disaster caused by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Credit: Pio Arce/Genesis Photos - World Vision

"We have to realize that a true ecological approach always becomes a social approach; it must integrate questions of justice in debates on the environment, so as to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.

"As the United States bishops have said, greater attention must be given to 'the needs of the poor, the weak and the vulnerable, in a debate often dominated by more powerful interests.' We need to strengthen the conviction that we are one single human family. There are no frontiers or barriers, political or social, behind which we can hide, still less is there room for the globalization of indifference."



The urgency to act falls on all humanity.

"The natural environment is a collective good, the patrimony of all humanity and the responsibility of everyone. If we make something our own, it is only to administer it for the good of all. If we do not, we burden our consciences with the weight of having denied the existence of others."

"Many things have to change course, but it is we human beings above all who need to change. We lack an awareness of our common origin, of our mutual belonging, and of a future to be shared with everyone."



It is a myth that humans can dominate the earth without consequences.

"We are not God. The earth was here before us and it has been given to us. This allows us to respond to the charge that Judaeo-Christian thinking, on the basis of the Genesis account which grants man "dominion" over the earth (cf. Gen 1:28), has encouraged the unbridled exploitation of nature by painting him as domineering and destructive by nature. This is not a correct interpretation of the Bible as understood by the Church."



The current level of inaction is indefensible.

"It is remarkable how weak international political responses have been. The failure of global summits on the environment make it plain that our politics are subject to technology and finance. There are too many special interests, and economic interests easily end up trumping the common good and manipulating information so that their own plans will not be affected."

Credit: UN Climate Change Conference, COP20, Lima/UNclimatechange, flickr

"As often occurs in periods of deep crisis which require bold decisions, we are tempted to think that what is happening is not entirely clear.

"This is the way human beings contrive to feed their self-destructive vices: trying not to see them, trying not to acknowledge them, delaying the important decisions and pretending that nothing will happen."



There is hope.

"Although the post-industrial period may well be remembered as one of the most irresponsible in history, nonetheless there is reason to hope that humanity at the dawn of the twenty-first century will be remembered for having generously shouldered its grave responsibilities."

"Human beings, while capable of the worst, are also capable of rising above themselves, choosing again what is good, and making a new start."



The full encyclical in English:

 

 

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